JEREMY DOOLEY ON MAKING A MARK

For Jeremy Dooley, an early educational project researching the works of Adrian Frutiger would be the initial driving force in the self taught type designers career. The second came in the form of Aviano, a highly successful titling family which eventually expanding into a further 6 Aviano family styles. Equipped with a handful of new Insigne releases to upload this week, we spoke to the face behind the fonts, Jeremy Dooley.

1. TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOURSELF

I am 29 years old and living in Chattanooga, Tennessee. As a child I lived most of my life overseas. I guess the southern United States is my adopted home. My wife is a doctor here in town, and I got married five months ago. My wife and I enjoy traveling.

2. HOW DID YOU FIRST GET INVOLVED IN TYPE DESIGN?

I first got into type design when I was given an assignment for my undergraduate classes. We were to take a famous type designer, do a report on him and design a 8½ x 11 poster showcasing his work. I chose Adrian Frutiger. As I began to examine his work more closely I was really amazed and stunned at the beauty of the letterforms. It was it that point that I began attempting to design my own typeface.

3. WHAT WAS THE FIRST TYPEFACE YOU CREATED?

My first complete character set was a serif face. It has never been released, and never will be-it’s horrible. The design is not cohesive at all- my first lesson that individual characters cannot stand out too much. My second attempt was a very futuristic typeface by the name of Shrike. It is no longer available as it was filled with errors, but to this day my favorite “genre” to design for is futuristic titling.

4. WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON?

I just finished up a new sans serif superfamily by the name of Savigny. It is my first super family, and it includes over 100 alternate characters. These alternates really change the entire typeface and so it is almost like getting four different fonts in one. My next project will be to digitize some more watercolor lettering by Cory Godbey to create a sequel to his successful Blue Goblet series.

SAVIGNY is my first super family, and it includes over 100 alternate characters. These alternates really change the entire typeface and so it is almost like getting four different fonts in one.

5. CAN YOU SHOW US SOME EXAMPLES OF YOUR WORK IN USE?

I love to see my work in movies. I also like a good identity; I first thought my type skills would be put to use making custom logotypes, not entire fonts, so it is great to see other designers use my work in that way. In general, I love to see my work used as a tool for other designers to make beautiful things.

AVIANO/ROBIN HOOD Jeremy Dooleys highly well received Aviano type family featured among all of the promotional graphics and output for the 2010 box office smash, Robin Hood.

YOUNGBLOOD/STARBUCKS Starbucks used a customised version of Jeremy Dooleys Youngblood script to create this bespoke coffee packaging.

PAULINE/YUMMO Yummo utilises Pauline perfectly, a sans-serf with a retro script influence. All corresponding branding material, menu’s and interior signage was produced using Pauline.

6. WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR THE FUTURE?

I hope to be able to continue to make type till I’m old and gray. I have been doing type design full time for nearly four years now. I look forward to collaborating with other designers for future face.

7. WHAT PROCESS DO YOU GO THROUGH WHEN GENERATING NEW IDEAS?

I have several different methods. I generally look to see what the market is looking for. In that way I am very much driven by current tastes. I also have a long list on my phone that I can quickly add to when inspiration strikes of different fun ideas. Before I begin a typeface I take a look at my ideas, and also take a look at my clip file, choose the best four ideas and began sketching. The best one is developed into a full font.


LOURDES/THE WILD PINEAPPLE Lourdes used for an identity and shop signage of The Wild Pineapple boutique in Knoxville, Tennessee.

8. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO AN INSPIRING TYPE DESIGNER?

I was entirely self-taught. Type design takes a special breed. To be honest I really don’t know what led me to this particular career path. It takes a special kind of dedication to learn the software and to deal with the intricate nuances of type design and all of the myriad different characters that need to be designed. Now there are a number of graduate programs that offer typeface design, so perhaps that is the best place to start. Business skills are important. Think like an entrepreneur.

Insigne’s Font Releases ›

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