INTRODUCING LATINOTYPE

Latinotype is an exciting new Chilean foundry that is quickly developing a reputation in the international typographic world. Although diverse, all of its typefaces have two prominent characteristics in common; their uniqueness, and the level of craftsmanship with which they were created.

Latinotype designers Miguel Hernández, Daniel Hernández and Luciano Vergara are clearly masters of the art, but their true strength lies in their spontaneity and creativity, and in their ability to think ‘outside the box.’ Unlike Europe and the US, Latin America has no established history of typographic design. This means that young designers teach themselves rather than learning from established masters, through a process of trial and error that really fosters creativity.

Perhaps this learning process is what is responsible for the unique and somewhat unorthodox character of Latinotype’s flagship fonts; Hernández, Sanchez, Guadelupe and Pincoya Black Pro. What is clear is that Latinotype is Latin American not just in name. The very design of their fonts reflects and embraces Latin American national identity and culture. Having absorbed the influences of Chilean political posters, the nueva canción chilena (political singer-songwriters) and Mauricio Amster, the Latinotype designers create fonts through which the whole history of Latin America can be read.

Although all three designers are Chilean, they have plans to introduce designs by Argentinian, Mexican, Venezuelan and Columbians designers soon. Eventually, Latinotype should become a collective that reflects the typographic output of a whole continent.

Latinotype have big plans. Not only are they hoping to establish type design more firmly as a practice in itself in Latin America rather than just an offshoot of graphic design, but they also hope to put Latin America on the world map in terms of typography. If their current output is anything to go by, they will no doubt soon have cemented their reputation as an international design force to be reckoned with. No matter how successful they become, it’s clear that Latinotype is a foundry which will never forget its roots and which will always retain a unique identity all of its own.

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